Five Methodist families of western Pennsylvania, 1785
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Five Methodist families of western Pennsylvania, 1785 Henthorn, Jones, Lackey, Murphy, Pumphrey by Raymond Martin Bell

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Published by R.M. Bell in Coralville, Iowa .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Pennsylvania

Subjects:

  • Methodists -- Pennsylvania -- Genealogy.,
  • Pennsylvania -- Genealogy.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Raymond Martin Bell.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsF148 .B45 1997
The Physical Object
Pagination14 leaves :
Number of Pages14
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL741050M
LC Control Number97132869

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Five Methodist families of western Pennsylvania, Henthorn, Jones, Lackey, Murphy, Pumphrey / Catalog Record Only Cover title. Includes bibliographical references (leaf 13) and index. Contributor: Bell, Raymond Martin Date:   Fells United Methodist Church has been known as the “Lighthouse on the Hill” since the congregation was founded in Pioneer Beazell and Fell families held early Methodist worship services in their homes in Seven years later, with an increasing congregation, the two families spearheaded the building of a log cabin church. Full text of "Families of the Wyoming Valley: biographical, genealogical and es of the bench and bar of Luzerne County, Pennsylvania" See other formats. The churches are the Methodist, Catholic, Presbyterian and United Presbyterian. The borough has four schools, and pupils enrolled. Source: Pages , History of Westmoreland County, Volume 1, Pennsylvania by John N. Boucher, New York, the Lewis Publishing Company,

western edge of this Conference was just west of the Allegheny Mountains so nearly miles of western Pennsylvania had to be crossed before they reached Ohio. Ohio, thirteen years old and the only state in the Northwest Territory in had drawn already hundreds of families from Pennsylvania. Travel to . Philadelphia, known casually as Philly, is the largest city in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania, and the sixth-most populous U.S. city with a estimated population of 1,, Since , the city has had the same geographic boundaries as Philadelphia County, the most populous county in Pennsylvania and the urban core of the eighth-largest U.S. metropolitan statistical area, with over 6 Country: United States. In western Pennsylvania and the adjacent parts of Virginia and Ohio territory, there was the Redstone Association. * (ibid., I, ) the New River Association was made up of the Baptist churches in Virginia west of the Blue Ridge (which had formerly been in the Strawberry Association) and the churches about Greenbrier, later constituted as a. He located in Smithfield township, Northampton county, Pennsylvania, between the years , as he was taxed there in the latter year, thus: "Garret Brodhead £7 s10 - and in £5 s4 d8 for six hundred acres land, five horses, seven cattle.".

"Pennsylvania's Soldiers' Orphan Schools." James Laughery Paul,, J. Fagan & Son. Brief account of the origin of the Civil war, the rise and Progress of the orphan system, and Legislative encactments. Forty-five schools are listed, along with names of pupils and staff. A1 "The Settlers' Forts of . Early Landowners of Pennsylvania: Atlas of Township Warrantee Maps of Berks County. Apollo, Pennsylvania Closson Press, FHL book E7ms; Henry, Mathew Schropp and M.K. Boyer. Township Map of Berks County, Pennsylvania edition published by Berks County Genealogical Society. Original edition published Bedford Co, PA Tax and Exoneration Lists.. Air Township (listed, but NO COOMBS) Bethel Township. COOMBS, John COOMBS, Edward COOMBS, Joseph [DKM Note: John is a separate entry, while Edward and Joseph are entered line by line next to each other.]Colerain Township. McCOOMBS, William (LDS Film # for Bedford Co, PA Tax and Exoneration Lists, 16th, . Allegheny County Pioneers. Moon Township. Robert Vance, who is thought to have been the first permanent settler in Moon township, settled in the vicinity of Mountour's warrant about the beginning of the Revolution and for the protection of himself and his neighbors, of whom several arrived within a few years, a stockade and blockhouse were built on his land.